Design Production / TITLE: GrapeFruit

SketchBook Research

Design Production, SketchBook No 2, Research 1 , Alan McLeod Design Production, SketchBook No 2, Research 2 , Alan McLeod Design Production, SketchBook No 2, Research 3 , Alan McLeod Design Production, SketchBook No 2, Research 4 , Alan McLeod Design Production, SketchBook No 2, Research 5 , Alan McLeod Design Production, SketchBook No 2, Research 6 , Alan McLeod

Mood Boards

Design Production, MoodBoards No 1, Alan McLeod Design Production, MoodBoards No 2, Alan McLeod Design Production, MoodBoards No 3, Alan McLeod Design Production, MoodBoards No 4, Alan McLeod Design Production, MoodBoards No 5, Alan McLeod

Concept Art

Design Production, Concept Art No 1, Alan McLeod Design Production, Concept Art No 2, Alan McLeod Design Production, Concept Art No 3, Alan McLeod

Story Board

Design Production, Scene Story Board, Alan McLeod

Pitch / Presentation

Design Production, Pitch-presentation 1, Alan McLeod Design Production, Pitch-presentation 2, Alan McLeod Design Production, Pitch-presentation 3, Alan McLeod Design Production, Pitch-presentation 4, Alan McLeod Design Production, Pitch-presentation 5, Alan McLeod Design Production, Pitch-presentation 6, Alan McLeod Design Production, Pitch-presentation 7, Alan McLeod Design Production, Pitch-presentation 8, Alan McLeod Design Production, Pitch-presentation 9, Alan McLeod Design Production, Pitch-presentation 10, Alan McLeod

Snyopsis

Dubliner Mary Manning (21) knew very little about the struggles of black South African people under the Apartheid regime when she refused to register the sale of 2 Outspan grapefruit in her workplace in 1984. Mary was simply following a directive from her union. A directive that led to her immediate suspension from her work place (Dunnes Stores, Henry Street). That same day eight of Mary’s friends and colleagues walked out in solidarity.

Mary, along with her co-workers fully expected to be back in work by the end of that week (if not the end of that day) but the reality could not have been further from the truth. What started out as a small act of workplace disobedience, turned an almost 3-year public fight for justice.

Following the arrival of supporters on the picket line, The strikers gained an education about the truth of what it meant to be Black and in South Africa under this horrific regime.

Despite harassment from the Gardai and disparagement from the striker’s family members and friends, the Irish Government and the Catholic Church, they refused to be silenced.

The sacrifices of these nine working-class Dubliners incredibly resulted in complete ban off all South African produce in Ireland until the end of the apartheid regime. plete ban off all South African produce in Ireland until the end of the apartheid regime. A stance with was followed by a knock-on effect in several countries throughout Europe.